May 27th, 2014
Working hard for something we don’t care about is called stress; working hard for something we love is called passion.

Simon Sinek (via stay-ocean-minded)

this Ted talk was way good

(via onheradventure)

(Source: psych-facts, via exercise-till-it-hurts)

crossfitters:

Juliette Chang-Fane 

crossfitters:

Juliette Chang-Fane 

(via exercise-till-it-hurts)

May 26th, 2014
applepiewithextrafreedom:

the-exercist:

fitblrholics:

If you look at the ingredients list and it’s a bunch of words you don’t even know… neither does your body (x)

Just like if you break apples and grapefruit down into their chemical components, I’m willing to bet that most people wouldn’t recognize the “ingredients” either. It’s a bunch of words you don’t even know:

Don’t use these scare tactics - Chemicals aren’t inherently bad. Literally everything is made up chemicals. Trust me, your body knows what niacin is. It knows how to digest fructose and calcium sulfate. Even if you only consume the most basic and “real” foods that are pulled directly off the vine, you’re still ingesting a series of chemical compounds that you probably can’t pronounce. That’s okay. 

also a lot of those big words you dont know are just big words for shit you DO know.

applepiewithextrafreedom:

the-exercist:

fitblrholics:

If you look at the ingredients list and it’s a bunch of words you don’t even know… neither does your body (x)

Just like if you break apples and grapefruit down into their chemical components, I’m willing to bet that most people wouldn’t recognize the “ingredients” either. It’s a bunch of words you don’t even know:

image

Don’t use these scare tactics - Chemicals aren’t inherently bad. Literally everything is made up chemicals. Trust me, your body knows what niacin is. It knows how to digest fructose and calcium sulfate. Even if you only consume the most basic and “real” foods that are pulled directly off the vine, you’re still ingesting a series of chemical compounds that you probably can’t pronounce. That’s okay. 

also a lot of those big words you dont know are just big words for shit you DO know.

What do I do if I can’t do push ups or modified push ups?

fitabled:

I got a good question in my mailbox today and I thought I would share the answer with everyone. The question is what should you do if you have trouble with even modified push ups? 

The best way to build up your strength and work your way up to modified push ups is though the wall push ups exercise. 

Which looks like this 

image

Here’s how you do a wall push up - Standing at arm’s length from a wall, extend your arms so your hands are flat on the wall at shoulder height, with your hands around shoulder width apart from each other. Inhale and, in one movement, press your body toward the wall as if doing a push-up. Exhale and push back to the original position, keeping your elbows close to your sides throughout.

The beauty of this exercise is you can easily control the difficulty. The way you adjust this is easy. The closer your feet are to the wall the easier the exercise is. The farther away your feet are from the wall the harder it is. 

If you are looking to build up strength to do pushups on the ground. I suggest you start with 3 sets of 8-12 reps at an angle which feels challenging on the last 2-3 reps of the exercise. Then repeat the workout every 2 days until you reach the point when you are strong enough to do modified push ups on the ground. 

eatcleanmakechanges:

skinnyfitandsexy:

the-exercist:

Having a flat stomach comes from eating “right,” doing cardio, and:
being genetically built to support a flat stomach
being capable of maintaining a healthy weight that allows you to have a flat stomach
having access to the money and resources necessary for maintaining such a diet and lifestyle
not experience any medical problems that may cause bloating or an extended abdominal area
not experience any hormone fluctuations that may cause bloating or an extended abdominal area
managing your stress to an extent that it does not affect your body fat content
getting enough sleep so that your body can regularly repair and care for itself
continuously holding yourself in a posture that displays a flat stomach
Let’s not forget all of the factors here. A flat stomach requires more than just planning out a certain diet and exercise routine. 

^🙏👏🙌

Such good information

eatcleanmakechanges:

skinnyfitandsexy:

the-exercist:

Having a flat stomach comes from eating “right,” doing cardio, and:

  • being genetically built to support a flat stomach
  • being capable of maintaining a healthy weight that allows you to have a flat stomach
  • having access to the money and resources necessary for maintaining such a diet and lifestyle
  • not experience any medical problems that may cause bloating or an extended abdominal area
  • not experience any hormone fluctuations that may cause bloating or an extended abdominal area
  • managing your stress to an extent that it does not affect your body fat content
  • getting enough sleep so that your body can regularly repair and care for itself
  • continuously holding yourself in a posture that displays a flat stomach

Let’s not forget all of the factors here. A flat stomach requires more than just planning out a certain diet and exercise routine. 

^🙏👏🙌

Such good information

(Source: ladysfitness, via livelaughandlose)

May 25th, 2014

crossfitters:

Megan: So Many Toys At The Wod Castle

(via exercise-till-it-hurts)

are you jealous of those other girls you reblog?
Asketh - Anonymous

blondebarbells:

Took a while to respond to this because I wanted to think about how I frame this. Essentially, this is what it comes down to.

When you see someone succeeding, and kicking ass- you have two options. You can be jealous of their success and try to tear them down to make yourself feel better. OR you can celebrate their success, and keep striving to better yourself as well. I choose the latter.

Another woman’s success is not your failure. We do not need to be pitted against each other. Support other women. Give them help when they need it. Praise their successes. Encourage them when they struggle. Stop thinking of other women as competition. Just because she is doing well does not mean that you can’t too. Another woman’s success is not your failure.

turningthetech:

you`re fucking kidding me

turningthetech:

you`re fucking kidding me

(Source: visually-enjoyable, via jjjjasmine)

May 24th, 2014
pdlcomics:

Died
Poorly Drawn Lines by Reza Farazmand[website | tumblr | twitter | facebook]

pdlcomics:

Died

Poorly Drawn Lines by Reza Farazmand
[website | tumblr | twitter | facebook]

(via thefrogman)

sexyfitness:

Ab Wheel Jackknife : Great lower abs exercise !

sexyfitness:

Ab Wheel Jackknife : Great lower abs exercise !

(via fitnessgifs4u)

saladforpresident:

Lazy Mondays: Seven Spoons’ Chickpea, Sundried Tomatoes, Kasha, Red Onion, Fistful of Herbs Salad with Feta Cheese and Chili Flakes
Serves 3
Difficulty Level: Easy, but takes a little prep since I fully endorse using dried chickpeas as opposed to canned. 
Notes: The more herbs, the better. I added kasha to Tara O’Brady’s recipe, but I think the recipe could take the addition of any grain - farro, quinoa, wheat berries etc. Makes it a little lighter (I photographed it both ways). Forego the cheese to make this a vegan entrée.

In honor of Lazy Mondays, where I feature a recipe from another blogger or cookbook author, this salad comes from one of my new favorite blogs, Seven Spoons. Tara O’Brady writes from southern Ontario. She is cooking with her forthcoming cookbook in my mind (the book will be released in 2015). Her photos are bright and hunger-inducing, and this salad was straight forward, healthy, but also pleasantly open for interpretation. Tara instructs us to add a “fistful of herbs” to the final product. She says, “The fistful of herbs is literal; I head outside to our herb boxes and pick whatever needs pruning or strikes my fancy.” In my case, I added two handfuls — I have small hands as well and I love a fragrant salad.

I happened to have about a cup of cooked kasha, buckwheat kernels, in the fridge, which I tossed in at the end to lighten up the dish. I love chickpeas, but they can be a bit dense, especially since we were eating this as a main course. 

Tara notes the red chili flakes are optional, but unless you are total spice-wuss, I suggest including them. For me, the heat was the best part. I also ate the salad on the warm side, and I thought this was perfect. Tara suggests refrigerating for two hours, before eating. Give that a try, but I was hungry and didn’t have the patience to wait. 

Ingredients
- 1/2 cup kasha (optional)
- 1/2 tsp unsalted butter
- 1 cup broth
- 1/4 large red onion, sliced wafer thin
- 2 tablespoons (30 ml) red wine vinegar
- Salt
- 6 tablespoons (90 ml) olive oil
- A good pinch, about 1/8 teaspoon, red chili flakes (optional)
- 1-2 cloves garlic, sliced wafer thin
- 8 sundried tomatoes, julienned
- 2 cups cooked chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
- 1 teaspoon (15 ml) English mustard
- Freshly ground black pepper
- Approximately 1/2 cup (125 ml) of mixed herbs; examples include parsley, thyme, cilantro, basil, oregano and mint
- 1/ cup crumbled goats milk feta cheese

Instructions

If using dried chickpeas, soak overnight or for at least 1-2 hours. boil, covered in water, until soft to the bite. Make sure they are fully cooked or the salad will appear dry and the beans won’t soak up the flavors. Drain, and set aside. 

If using the kasha, bring broth to a boil. Add butter and kasha, turn off the heat, cover and allow to sit while you make the rest of the salad. The grain will absorb the liquid and will be ready to fluff with a fork. 

In a small bowl, douse the red onion with the vinegar. Sprinkle over a good pinch of salt, then use your fingers to squish the mixture a bit - this will work the salt into the onions and expedite the breaking down of their acrid bite. Set aside.

In medium saucepan over medium-low heat, warm the olive oil, garlic and red chili flakes. If there is any sizzle at all, turn the heat to low. Once the oil is fragrant and the garlic turns translucent, turn off the heat. Add the sundried tomatoes and chickpeas at this point, allowing them to steep as the oil comes to room temperature. This step of bathing the chickpeas in the warm oil is wholly optional, but I feel it imparts more flavor into the beans.

Once the oil has cooled, remove the tomatoes and chickpeas from the saucepan and put them into a large bowl (keep the oil, set it aside). Do the same with the onions, adding them to the salad but reserving the vinegar.

In that vinegar bowl, whisk in the mustard, salt and pepper. Whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in the steeped olive oil. Once the vinaigrette is emulsified and thick, coarsely chop the herbs and add to the bowl, reserving about 1 tbs as garnish at the end. Pour this dressing over the chickpeas and tomatoes. Toss to combine. Add Kasha and gently fold in to the mixture. 

Crumble the feta over the top, then fold gently to distribute. Check for seasoning. 

Serve warm, or refrigerate for 2 hours or more to let the flavors infuse further. Garnish with remaining herbs sprinkled on top. 

(Source: saladforpresident, via healthirea)

May 23rd, 2014

saladforpresident:

Shredded Raw Brussel Sprouts with Pecorino, Lemon and Olive Oil

Difficulty Level: Easy

Notes: A hearty raw salad, super healthy. Use the best olive oil you have for this one since it is so simple. Great as a packed lunch as well since the brussel sprouts won’t wilt. 

This salad is a minimalist work, an elegant and restrained salad. If I had Italian aristocrats coming for dinner, I would make this salad, being careful of course to use the best olive oil and Pecorino I could find. Go to your local cheese monger and ask to try a few cheeses that would be similar to a Pecorino or a Parmesan, and see what you like the best. The main difference between Parmesan and Pecorino are the regions they come from, and that Parmesan is made from cow’s milk, while Pecorino is made from sheep’s milk. They are both salty, nutty and hard, perfect for grating over your shredded brussel sprouts. 

This salad will be great the next day, so make extra to bring to work. 

Ingredients

- 1 1/2 lb brussel sprouts

- 1 small clove garlic

- 1 shallot

- juice of 1 lemon

- olive oil

- Pecorino Romano

- toasted pine nuts

Instructions

Wash and dry brussel sprouts. Cut off the bottom of each one and discard. With a sharp knife, hold sprout with flat side down on cutting board and slice each sprout as thinly as possible. You can use a mandolin for this, but be careful! 

Mince shallot and garlic clove, add to sprouts. Squeeze juice of one lemon over sprouts and drizzle with olive oil and stir until the greens are well-coated. Crack pepper and sea salt on top. 

Using a micro-grater, grate cheese on top of salad, toss to combine. Add as much cheese as you fancy. 

Optional: toast a few pine nuts and toss them on top.

(Source: saladforpresident, via healthirea)

kamikatlifts:

crossfitters:

Carlee acevedo Fuller

HOW

kamikatlifts:

crossfitters:

Carlee acevedo Fuller

HOW

(via healthirea)