July 15th, 2014

backonpointe:

tribesports:

Stay fit in summer with the 30 Day Crunch Challenge , the 30 Day Lunge Challenge and the 30 Day Burpee Challenge !!

Nice simple challenges!

pizzafemme:

mayakern:

cute underwear is the best cure all for low self esteem

GPOY

(via part-l-ypoison)

chasefear:

Easy Run: These light runs are best done at a conversational pace. Meaning, if you can’t run and recap last night’s episode of “The Bachelor” at the same time, you’re going too fast!
LSD: Excuse me?! No, not that LSD. In this case, the acronym stands for long slow distance, or the week’s longest run. The only kind of trippin’ runners might be doing out on the road is over their own shoelaces.
Recovery Run: Also lovingly referred to as “junk miles,” a recovery run is a short, slow run that takes place within a day after a long, harder run. This teaches the body how to work through a fatigued state - a dress rehearsal many runners will be thankful for at mile 19 of a marathon!
Speedwork: Aimed at improving running speed, these types of workouts can include intervals, hill repeats, and tempo runs (all explained below). In addition to getting faster and increasing endurance, speedwork, well, usually hurts a lot, too!
Interval Training: By alternating specific time periods of specific high and low intensity during a run, intervals are just one way to get faster, build strength, and see calories melt away.
Hill Repeats: Runners make like Jack and Jill and go up the hill (again and again) in this other cruel form of speedwork. Heading up at a 5K pace and recovering down at an easy jog or walk, the number of hill repeats per workout depends on experience and fitness levels. But the benefits from the pain? Speed, strength, and confidence!
Fartleks: A fartlek not only makes us giggle, it’s an easier form of speedwork for beginners. Meaning “speed play” in Swedish, fartleks are easy runs broken up by quick sprinting bursts. When changing speed though, the runner calls the shots (unlike more rigid intervals). So newbies can make it as fast and as hard as they can handle. That’s what she said.
Tempo Run: Usually done just once a week, tempo runs are a tougher form of speed training. Runners challenge themselves to hold a “threshold” (or comfortably hard) pace for a 20-minute period during a run - along with a good warm-up and cool down, of course.
Pick-Ups: Short, gentle increases in speed, or pick-ups, at the end of a run help aid recovery. Sorry, they unfortunately have nothing to do with these cheesy lines.
Strength Training: Runners need muscles, too! Among its many other benefits, strength training, or exercises performed with or without weights (think push-ups, squats, and planks), helps runners become stronger and prevent injuries. Their bodies take quite a beating while hammering it out on the road, so they need all the help they can get.
Cross-training: Runners should also squeeze in time for cross-training, or sports and exercises other than running that improve overall fitness and strength. Great examples of cross-training for runners include cycling, swimming, yoga, water running, and weight training.
Rest Day: Choosing the couch over the road at least one day a week allows a runner’s body to recover and repair muscles. We say rest days can still be all about marathons though - a “Friday Night Lights” marathon, perhaps?

chasefear:

Easy Run: These light runs are best done at a conversational pace. Meaning, if you can’t run and recap last night’s episode of “The Bachelor” at the same time, you’re going too fast!

LSD: Excuse me?! No, not that LSD. In this case, the acronym stands for long slow distance, or the week’s longest run. The only kind of trippin’ runners might be doing out on the road is over their own shoelaces.

Recovery Run: Also lovingly referred to as “junk miles,” a recovery run is a short, slow run that takes place within a day after a long, harder run. This teaches the body how to work through a fatigued state - a dress rehearsal many runners will be thankful for at mile 19 of a marathon!

Speedwork: Aimed at improving running speed, these types of workouts can include intervals, hill repeats, and tempo runs (all explained below). In addition to getting faster and increasing endurance, speedwork, well, usually hurts a lot, too!

Interval Training: By alternating specific time periods of specific high and low intensity during a run, intervals are just one way to get faster, build strength, and see calories melt away.

Hill Repeats: Runners make like Jack and Jill and go up the hill (again and again) in this other cruel form of speedwork. Heading up at a 5K pace and recovering down at an easy jog or walk, the number of hill repeats per workout depends on experience and fitness levels. But the benefits from the pain? Speed, strength, and confidence!

Fartleks: A fartlek not only makes us giggle, it’s an easier form of speedwork for beginners. Meaning “speed play” in Swedish, fartleks are easy runs broken up by quick sprinting bursts. When changing speed though, the runner calls the shots (unlike more rigid intervals). So newbies can make it as fast and as hard as they can handle. That’s what she said.

Tempo Run: Usually done just once a week, tempo runs are a tougher form of speed training. Runners challenge themselves to hold a “threshold” (or comfortably hard) pace for a 20-minute period during a run - along with a good warm-up and cool down, of course.

Pick-Ups: Short, gentle increases in speed, or pick-ups, at the end of a run help aid recovery. Sorry, they unfortunately have nothing to do with these cheesy lines.

Strength Training: Runners need muscles, too! Among its many other benefits, strength training, or exercises performed with or without weights (think push-ups, squats, and planks), helps runners become stronger and prevent injuries. Their bodies take quite a beating while hammering it out on the road, so they need all the help they can get.

Cross-training: Runners should also squeeze in time for cross-training, or sports and exercises other than running that improve overall fitness and strength. Great examples of cross-training for runners include cycling, swimming, yoga, water running, and weight training.

Rest Day: Choosing the couch over the road at least one day a week allows a runner’s body to recover and repair muscles. We say rest days can still be all about marathons though - a “Friday Night Lights” marathon, perhaps?

(via the-exercist)

girlgrowingsmall:

ocfitness:

love these anatomy gifs

Oh, I thought it was just part of that weird skeleton photo trend that’s going around.

girlgrowingsmall:

ocfitness:

love these anatomy gifs

Oh, I thought it was just part of that weird skeleton photo trend that’s going around.

(via tumblrgym)

July 14th, 2014
Everyday you skip a workout is a day you waste
Remember that

By MissShelbyCruz (via missshelbycruz)

Uh…so the day that I took a 6 hour comprehensive exam to earn my Master’s Degree was wasted? The day that my best friend got married was wasted? Sunday, a day that I spent cleaning my house and getting up to date on all my errands, was wasted? All because I “skipped” a workout?

No, forget that. That’s not a healthy mentality. There is more to your life than working out - Never forget that the other actions and events during your day also have value. You’re not inherently wasting time just because your attention is focused elsewhere. 

(via the-exercist)

(via the-exercist)

Internet Rule: You’re sick cuz you’re fat.

thefrogman:

Broke your toe? Fat.

Got the flu? Fat. 

Arm falls off? Non-fat people have all their arms. 

Allergies? Have you tried eating more salads? 

July 13th, 2014
the-exercist:

Muscle & Fitness Magazine:

90-Degree Cable Chest Press
Attach cables to a high pulley. Facing away from the machine, place your feet should-width apart and bend forward until your back is parallel to the floor. Grasp the cables in each hand, bending your elbows 90 degrees.
Keeping your gaze forward, press the cables downward with your palms facing behind you until your thumbs are about six inches apart and your arms are straight.
Slowly return to the start position, keeping your torso parallel to the floor. Don’t let your elbows drift past your shoulders.

the-exercist:

Muscle & Fitness Magazine:

90-Degree Cable Chest Press

Attach cables to a high pulley. Facing away from the machine, place your feet should-width apart and bend forward until your back is parallel to the floor. Grasp the cables in each hand, bending your elbows 90 degrees.

Keeping your gaze forward, press the cables downward with your palms facing behind you until your thumbs are about six inches apart and your arms are straight.

Slowly return to the start position, keeping your torso parallel to the floor. Don’t let your elbows drift past your shoulders.

iwillbeskinny123:

fitness, health and sexy motivation for strong confident women

iwillbeskinny123:

fitness, health and sexy motivation for strong confident women

(Source: thefood-blog, via beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood)

July 12th, 2014
the-exercist:

Plyometric Push-Up

Get on all fours on an exercise mat. Place your hands on the mat slightly wider than and in line with your shoulders. Your body should form a straight line from ankles to shoulders. Squeeze your core and lower your body until your chest nearly touches the floor. Then, keeping your core engaged, explosively push up through your arms so that your hands lift off of the floor. Keep your elbows slightly bent as you land, moving straight into lowering again. That’s one rep.

the-exercist:

Plyometric Push-Up

Get on all fours on an exercise mat. Place your hands on the mat slightly wider than and in line with your shoulders. Your body should form a straight line from ankles to shoulders. Squeeze your core and lower your body until your chest nearly touches the floor. Then, keeping your core engaged, explosively push up through your arms so that your hands lift off of the floor. Keep your elbows slightly bent as you land, moving straight into lowering again. That’s one rep.

(Source: womenshealthmag.com)

healthyshrrrr1mp:

I’m reblogging this again because I want to add that images like this are literally 100% the only reason I feel better about my body. Because when I’m having a shitty body image day, I look in the mirror and I remember that there are people who think bodies like mine are beautiful and lovely and sexy and I give myself permission to love myself even though my body is rarely reflected in mainstream media.

healthyshrrrr1mp:

I’m reblogging this again because I want to add that images like this are literally 100% the only reason I feel better about my body. Because when I’m having a shitty body image day, I look in the mirror and I remember that there are people who think bodies like mine are beautiful and lovely and sexy and I give myself permission to love myself even though my body is rarely reflected in mainstream media.

(Source: bluehairedkitten, via wannaberunnerrr)

July 11th, 2014

Tom preparing for Coriolanus

(Source: hiddlestonedcumberbitch, via fitnessgifs4u)

fitnessgifs4u:

Most Effective Cardio Workout - Tabata Style…VIDEO

(Source: fitnessgifs4u, via livelaughandlose)